Permitted Development

 

Find out more about the work you can undertake to your house without planning permission below and how we can help with your permitted development.


Introduction

First introduced in 1995 to help to simplify the planning process permitted development rights allowed central government to permit certain types of developments and these were known as permitted developments. Generally permitted development (PD) relates to minor changes to existing properties and allow these changes without the need to gain planning permission from the local planning authority. Permitted development rights allow for changes to domestic and commercial properties but there are some restrictions that remove these rights in certain situations. Since being introduced the rights have been revised in 2013 and 2016 with the current version being adopted in 2019.

Types of Householder Permitted Development Rights

The rights that relate to work on a house are allocated a different category depending on the type of work that is to be undertaken:

Class A – enlargement, improvement or alteration

Class B – additions etc to the roof

Class C – other alterations to the roof

Class D – porches

Class E – buildings etc

Class F – hard surfaces

Class G – chimney, flue etc

Class H – microwave antenna

Class A

This class includes the permitted development right to add an extension to your house without the requirement to gain planning permission. In general terms this allows a householder to build a single-storey extension to a:

  • Detached house that extends beyond the rear wall of the house up to 8 metres - not on article 2(3) land and with neighbour consultation

  • Semi-detached and terraces house that extends beyond the rear wall of the house up to 6 metres - not on article 2(3) land and with neighbour consultation

  • Detached house that extends beyond the rear wall of the house up to 4 metres - on article 2(3) land and without neighbour consultation

  • Semi-detached and terraced house that extends beyond the rear wall of the house up to 3 metres - on article 2(3) land and without neighbour consultation

  • Side elevation of a house up to half the width of the existing house - not on article 2(3) land

  • Side extensions are not allowed on article 2(3) land

 

Rear extensions that extend beyond the rear wall by 4 metres (detached) and 3 metres (other) will require the local authority to notify the adjoining neighbours of the proposed work. This is called the Neighbour Consultation Scheme.

In general terms a householder can build a single-storey extension to these dimensions if:

  • It does not result in area of the house being more than 50% of the curtilage area with the inclusion of existing extensions, outbuildings, sheds etc.

  • The maximum height is below 4 metres and lower than the existing house ridge height

  • The eaves height is no higher than 3 metres when closer than 2 metres to a boundary

  • Materials used are of a similar appearance to the existing

  • No balcony, veranda or raised platform is included

  • It does not extend beyond the principle elevation or a side elevation that fronts a highway

  • No cladding is included on article 2(3) land

Single Storey Side Extensions if:

  • The maximum width is 50% of the original house (measured at the widest point)

  • It does not result in the area of the house being more than 50% of the curtilage area with the inclusion of existing extensions, outbuildings, sheds etc.

  • The maximum height is below 4 metres and lower than the existing house ridge height

  • The eaves height is no higher than 3 metres when closer than 2 metres to a boundary

  • Materials used are of a similar appearance to the existing

  • No balcony, veranda or raised platform is included

  • It does not extend beyond the principle elevation or a side elevation that fronts a highway

  • Side extensions are not allowed on article 2(3) land

A two-storey extension if:

  • It does not result in area of the house being more than 50% of the curtilage area with the inclusion of existing extensions, outbuildings, sheds etc.

  • It does not extend beyond the rear wall of the house by more than 3 metres

  • The eaves and ridge heights that are not higher than the existing

  • The roof pitch matches the existing (when practicable)

  • It is no closer than 7 metres to the rear boundary

  • Side windows are obscure glazed and non-opening up to 1.7m from the floor of the room where installed

  • The eaves height no higher than 3 metres when closer than 2 metres to a boundary

  • Materials used are of a similar appearance to the existing

  • No balcony, veranda or raised platform is included

  • It does not extend beyond the principle elevation or a side elevation that fronts a highway

  • Two-storey extensions are not allowed on article 2(3) land

Class B

This class includes the permitted development right to convert your loft area to provide additional living accommodation without the requirement to gain planning permission. In general terms this can be undertaken if:

  • Additional roof space created does not exceed 40 cubic metres for terraced houses and 50 cubic metres for detached and semi-detached houses

  • A dormer isn’t added to the existing roof slope of the principle elevation

  • Materials used are of a similar appearance

  • Dormers or any part of the extension are not higher than the highest part of an existing roof

  • Side windows are obscure glazed and non-opening up to 1.7m from the floor of the room where installed

  • Original eaves are retained, and dormers are set back as far as possible from these and at least 200mm

  • No balconies, verandas or raised platforms are included

  • Roof enlargement does not overhang an outer face of a wall of the original house

Class C

This class includes the permitted development right to add rooflights to any slope of your roof of your house without the requirement to gain planning permission. In general terms this can be undertaken if:

  • The rooflight does not protrude more than 150mm above the existing roof slope

  • On side elevations windows are obscure glazed and non-opening up to 1.7m from the floor of the room where installed

  • No alteration can be higher than the highest part of roof or stand out above the roof ridge

Class D

This class is for the permitted development right to add a porch to the outside of any external door. In general terms this can be undertaken if:

  • The external ground area of the structure is less than 3 square metres

  • Any part of the structure is less than 3 metres above ground level

  • Any part of the structure is more than 2 metres away from a boundary that fronts a highway

Class E

This class includes the permitted development right to add outbuildings and fuel storage containers in the curtilage of your house without the requirement to gain planning permission. Examples of these include sheds, greenhouses, garages, other ancillary garden buildings such as swimming pools, ponds, sauna cabins, kennels, enclosures (including tennis courts) and many other kinds of structure for a purpose incidental to the enjoyment of the dwelling house. In general terms this can be undertaken if:

  • The buildings are behind the principle elevation of the original house

  • They do not exceed 50% of the total land surrounds the original house

  • Are not separate, self-contained, living accommodation and do not have any microwave antenna

  • Have a maximum eaves height of 2.5 metres

  • An overall height of less than 4 metres with a dual pitch roof and less than 3 metres for others

  • Have a maximum height of 2.5 metres if less than 2 metres from a boundary

  • Raised platforms and decking is less than 300mm high

  • Fuel container capacity is less than 3,500 litres

  • The structure is less than 20 metres from the wall of a house in a World Heritage Site, National Park, area of outstanding natural beauty or the broads. If more than 20 metres, then the area covered should be less than 10 metres square.

  • The structure is not located on curtilage land at the side of a house on article 2(3) land

  • Planning permission is required for listed buildings

Class F

This class includes the permitted development right to add or replace a hard surface within the curtilage of your house without the requirement to gain planning permission. In general terms this can be undertaken if:

  • The hard surface is for any purpose that’s incidental for the enjoyment of the dwelling house

  • It is the partial or full replacement of an existing surface

  • The surface is porous or includes a direct run-off to a porous or permeable area in the house curtilage when the area is over 5 metres square or the area is between a wall of the principle elevation and the highway

Article 2(3) Land

This is defined as land within:

  • a conservation area; or

  • an area of outstanding natural beauty; or

  • an area specified by the Secretary of State for the purposes of enhancement and protection of the natural beauty and amenity of the countryside; or

  • the Broads; or

  • a National Park; or

  • a World Heritage Site.

Article 4 Direction

In addition to the above restrictions planning authorities can also remove Permitted Development Rights by issuing an Article 4 direction meaning that planning permission is required for work that does not usually require it. The reason that they are issued is to protect the character of an area that is acknowledged to be important, commonly conservation areas.

Lawful Development Certificate

 

When undertaking work under Permitted Development it is sometimes unclear if the work to be undertaken meets the requirements and an option to get clarification is to apply for a lawful development certificate from the local authority. This certificate is not planning permission but provides proof that the proposed work is lawful. Even when the work clearly qualifies to be Permitted Development this certificate can be useful in the avoidance of disputes and helpful in answering queries raised by potential buyers and their legal representatives. In England a fee of £103 is payable for the application process.

How we can help with Permitted Development

Before adding an extension or altering your property with Permitted Development you will need to consider compliance with the rules, but you should also be considering the design of the structure and how you want to use the new/altered space. Though the rules are restrictive there is still flexibility to achieve a design that gives you the space and appearance you desire.

 

Architecture First can assist in this outcome by using our knowledge of Permitted Development and the brief that you provide to produce concept designs for various options and assist in making the final choice. We would then produce scale drawings for inclusion in applications for lawful development certificates and when required for the Neighbour Consultation Scheme. We would always recommend the gaining of a lawful development certificate.

 

Though Permitted Development projects do not require planning permission many will need Building Regulation Approval.

Contact us for Permitted Development

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Derbyshire England

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